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Greetings!

'A gaping silken dragon,/Puffed by the wind, suffices us for God./We, not the City, are the Empire's soul:/A rotten tree lives only in its rind.'

Sunday, 10 March 2013

Finally...

finally, finally... the Pipistrello is finished. Or, more accurately, as finished as my patience will allow. Here it is, reasonably resplendent in its over-water/desert/East Africa anti-camouflage finish:



The smaller aircraft is a Nardi FN305, a very successful trainer used by Italy and the Romanians. It gives some idea of the size of 'the bat'.



Right, SM81 out of the way, so what next? A recovery Hetzer, Peninsular War British in 28mm, a few more War of 1812 in 20mm, or a Hurricane, or a Breda???

14 comments:

  1. I really like the red/white scheme.
    If you are keen upon planes you should read " Beyond the blue horizon" by Alexander Frater.It is a splendid read indeed!
    What the 20mm 1812 chaps for a change? Or even dip your toe in some Fantasy project...
    best wishes
    Alan

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    1. Cheers, Alan. I've gone for the 1812 fellows, painting British regulars and Canadian militia. I'll have quite a few British and Canadians soon, but of the Yankee invaders I have none. So, it will be quite a long term project.

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  2. What was the thinking behind the red and white!

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    1. For enlightenment, see next post...

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  3. A really nice job on that... I've seen b&w pictures of that scheme, but never really registered how useless and impractical it was... or how stunning. Well done that man!

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    1. Stunning wins hands down any time - when it comes to models! Er, I mean models as in kits, of course.

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  4. Very nice! I always like that colour scheme, I guess they considered more important the recovery of downed crew rather than the menace of the almost non-existant Ethiopian air force.

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    1. Thanks, Giano. It wasn't just the rather knife happy Ethiopians the RA was worried about - too much water (as in the Med), or too little (as in the Libyan desert) was also the issue. And it makes a great finish on kits!

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  5. Lovely, lovely stuff. That scheme is stunning.

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    1. Thanks, Nick. The worrying thing is that I've now found loads of photographs of different Italian aircraft sporting variants of the same finish - but I've got almost no room left for more aircraft. AAARGH!

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  6. Fascinating, First time I've never seen a plane disguised as a circus tent, or perhaps a peppermint stick. Now I'm curious about the under side.

    Pretty handsome finished model though.

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    1. I like the circus tent! Sadly, the underside is just plain, boring ivory/cream. Oh well, perhaps one can have too much of a good thing.

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  7. Recovery Hetzer! Btw, did you manage to find some chain for your Bergepanzer III ?

    Cheers, Dave

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    1. Hi, Dave. The Hetzer is next on the list (after the 1812 Canadians), and, no, sadly, I still haven't sourced a bit of tiny chain. But I'm keeping a weather eye out.

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